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What is a Speech-Language Pathologist?
Speech-Language Pathologists (SLPs) are professionals who have training and expertise in evaluating, diagnosing, and treating a wide range of speech, language, communication, and swallowing disorders in individuals of all ages – from newborn to seniors. They also advocate for the prevention of such disorders.  SLPs work independently or as part of interprofessional teams in: hospitals, clinics, schools, rehabilitation centres, nursing homes, early intervention programs, universities, colleges, research centres, and private practices.  In Newfoundland and Labrador, SLPs must be licensed in order to practice.

Some Typical Issues Speech-Language Pathologists Can Help With:

  • Speech delays and disorders  including articulation, phonology and motor speech disorders
  • Language delays and disorders, including expression and comprehension in oral and non-verbal contexts
  • Fluency disorders, including stuttering
  • Voice and resonance disorders
  • Swallowing and feeding disorders in adults, children and infants
  • Cognitive-communicative disorders including social communication skills, reasoning, problem solving and executive function
  • Pre-literacy and literacy skills including phonological awareness, decoding, reading comprehension and writing
  • Communication and swallowing disorders related to other issues including hearing impairments, traumatic brain injury, dementia, developmental, intellectual or genetic disorders and neurological impairments

What is an Audiologist?
Audiologists are professionals who have training and expertise in evaluating, diagnosing, and treating a wide range of hearing and balance disorders in individuals of all ages – from newborn to seniors. They also advocate for the prevention of such disorders.  Audiologists  work independently or as part of interprofessional teams in: hospitals, clinics, schools, early intervention programs, research centres, private practices, rehabilitation centres, government agencies, manufacturing companies, industrial settings, colleges and universities.  In Newfoundland and Labrador, Audiologists must be licensed in order to practice.

Some Typical Issues Audiologist Can Help With:

  • Hearing disorders in infants, children and adults
  • Amplification such as hearing aids and other assistive listening devices
  • Auditory processing disorders: issues with how the brain processes sound
  • Tinnitus: noise or ringing in the ears
  • Hyperacusis and Misophonia: sensitivities to particular sounds
  • Balance disorders including dizziness or vertigo caused by Ménières disease, ear infections and trauma to the skull

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